Kentucky Teacher Says Snakes and Mice Are Falling From the Ceiling

by Taylor Cunningham
kentucky-teacher-snakes-mice-falling-ceiling
(Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)

A Kentucky English teacher is making headlines after proving that his school has an unsavory and creepy pest problem that includes snakes, roaches, and more.

Nathan Spalding headed to work at Henry Clay High School in Lexington on Wed. Sept. 21 to find a snake wrapped around his classroom phone. After the state’s Fish and Wildlife identified the serpent as a rat snake, he posted his grief on Facebook. And apparently, the incident wasn’t the first of its kind.

“I certainly did not anticipate having a baby snake fall from the ceiling and cuddle my phone,” he wrote. “This little guy gave me quite the surprise this morning. Special thanks to Molly Haggerty Jones for calling someone to help.”

Spalding then admitted that the school is already “infested with roaches, spiders, and mice.” And his early morning “surprise” led to a discovery of “a nest of snakes living in the ceiling.”

“Just another day living the dream…” he added.

The Kentucky High School Doesn’t Just Have a Snake Problem

The day after noticing the snake problem, Spalding spoke to the Lexington Herald-Leader and admitted that several of his colleagues have complained about mice in the building. He said that one teacher reported one mouse falling from their ceiling during class. And another said that at least three had dropped from the ceiling this year.

When the publication reached out to the school’s administration, it learned that Henry Clay High School opened five decades ago. The building, which doesn’t have AC, is up for a replacement or major renovation.

The school’s principal, Paul Little, sent letters to all the student’s homes and released a statement claiming that infestations are common in the fall. But he’s taking all the steps needed to ensure the issue is resolved quickly.

“As the weather begins to turn cooler, it is not uncommon for rodents and pests to find their way into buildings,” he wrote. “Each fall, our buildings and grounds maintenance teams work proactively to lay traps and spray repellent. Additionally, last week, our building was evaluated and treated by professional exterminators as part of the district’s ongoing maintenance protocols. We will continue to take all steps necessary to ensure that henry clay high school is a welcoming place to learn — and work.”

Spalding shared that the school has been trying to quell its rodent problem. But he doesn’t think the efforts will be enough.

“The custodians have been using glue traps to catch them,” he said. “However, some mice will chew off their limbs to escape the glue.”

Outsider.com