Spike in Coyote Attacks Leaves Kansas Dog Owners Terrified

by Megan Molseed
spike-coyote-attacks-leaves-kansas-dog-owners-terrified
(Getty Images/David C Stephens)

Kansas dog owners are on edge these days as residents are seeing a spike in coyote attacks on their beloved pets. According to reports, vet clinics in and around Kansas’s Johnson County are seeing a major spike in attacks on small animals. Most of these attacks, the experts note are the result of aggressive coyotes.

Area dog owners such as Maggie Uhruh note that the recent surge in coyote sightings and attacks is a major concern. As the owner of a small dog, Uhruh says that she feels these concerns every time she lets her seven-pound pet outdoors.

“I have a dog that is seven and a half pounds,” Maggie Uhruh says. The Kansas dog owner says that they don’t have a fence at their home. This, Uhruh says, leads her to “always worry when I let her out that a coyote is just going to snatch her up.”

Coyote Sightings Are Up In Kansas Neighborhoods, Residents Say

Maggie Uhruh says she knows these coyote concerns are a valid worry. Noting that she has been seeing more of these wild animals in her neighborhood in recent weeks.

“We’ll be driving to school early in the morning when it’s still dark outside,” Uhruh relates. “And we’ll just see them run across the streets.”

“My neighborhood has a lot of coyotes,” notes another Johnson county resident, Hannah Cox of the coyote surge.

“My brother’s close friend has a little dog,” Cox explains.

“And when they let it out, it got bit by a coyote,” the Kansas resident adds. “And its whole ribcage was smashed.”

Kansas Residents Are Urged To Keep Pets Leashed, Leave Lights On Outdoors, And Never Leave The Animals Unsupervised

Area residents are advising that pet owners take some easy precautions to keep pets safe as the coyote sightings continue. Some of these tips include keeping the animals leashed and making sure the outdoor areas are illuminated. And, most importantly, it’s important that pet owners not leave their pets unsupervised – especially at night.

Hannah Cox notes that having a fence as a layer of protection against wild animals is very helpful.

“It helps having a fence,” Cox relates of the extra layer of safety. However, fences aren’t fail-safe protecting homes from an intruding coyotes. Coyotes are known to be able to jump pretty high…sometimes even over a backyard gate. So, staying with the animals is likely the safest option for all area pet owners.

“I’m always out there with her,” Uhruh says of her beloved pooch. “Especially at night.”

Outsider.com