Experienced Climber Dies in Death Valley Rockslide

by Will Shepard
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A California rock climber fell to his death during a descent in a canyon. Authorities are reporting that Justin Ibershoff, 38, of Los Angeles passed away in Death Valley.

The climber was descending a canyon when a rockslide caused him to fall. Unfortunately, Ibershoff was pronounced dead on the scene by the Inyo County Sheriff’s Office.

Ibershoff and six of his climbing partners were all exceptionally good at canyoneering. The group was attempting to descend Deimos Canyon when Ibershoff stepped on a rock that slipped. That rock triggered more rocks to go and quickly, consequently prompting a rockslide.

Authorities responding to the distress call say that the climber was carried past two of his climbing partners. After Ibershoff went past his partners, he went over a 95-foot dry fall.

Climber Fell to His Death in Death Valley

Once the distress call was into a rescue search organization. They went looking for Ibershoff almost immediately. The search took a few hours, but eventually, they found Ibershoff.

The officers responding from the hospital say that when they got to the accident, he was dead. Officers say that they took the body away from the canyon the next day. The situation was reportedly too precarious for rescue teams to extract his body during the rescue attempt.

The Inyo County search and rescue team performed the rescue with a helicopter.

Additionally, the situation is still incredibly sketchy, and climbers in the Death Valley region canyoneering need to be extremely cautious. Officers are issuing a warning to all of the climbers considering heading out in Inyo County.

“Conditions in that area of the canyon remain unstable, and canyoneers are [advising people] to avoid the upper section of Deimos Canyon.”

So, for those who love the adrenaline rush of climbing, make certain that everything is incredibly safe. Of course, accidents like these are hard to predict but make sure that you mitigate as much of the risks as possible.

Outsider.com