‘Extremely Rare’ Carp Sold for Over $3,000 at Auction

by Quentin Blount
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An “extremely rare strain of carp” was recently the highlight of an auction sale in the United Kingdom.

The unique fish was the main focus at the auction. It was at the center of a bidding war among British Fisheries who were in attendance.

The 13-pound mirror carp is nicknamed the “tiger carp” for its unique stripes. It had representatives from each of the fisheries all vying to become the owner of the fish. It is believed that the mirror carp is the first of its kind in the U.K.

The online bidding for the prize fish began at $685 USD, according to the Angling Times of the U.K. The well-known fish farmer Mark Simmonds of Heather Fisheries advertised the sale. It wasn’t long before fishery owners across the nation were making offers left and right to claim ownership of the unique fish.

However, it was Linda Candy, a co-owner of the Todber Manor Fisheries, who submitted the winning bid of over three grand. Candy was able to walk away with the prize in hand with a winning bid of $3,425 USD. Reports say that was she made the purchase of the rare fish to surprise her husband John. We imagine her husband must be an avid fisherman and collector of rare fish.

Candy’s company, Todber Manor Fisheries, is located on 125 acres of Dorset countryside. They claim to be the “home to some of the finest carp and coarse fishing in the southwest.”

Their property contains 11 lakes, which includes four different specimen carp lakes. The lakes are well known for thier fishing, but they also provide one of the few places in Dorset to catch catfish. Carp fishing is extremely popular in Britain and in Europe in general. Not so much in the United States.

Plans for Unique Carp Are Unclear

Other than being a prize for Candy’s husband, the exact plans for the high-priced carp are unclear. Todber Manor may decide that it will be put on display or planted into one of its lakes. It is set for delivery in February.

Carp are various species of oily freshwater fish from the family Cyprinidae. It’s a very large group of fish that are native to Europe and Asia. However, they are generally considered an invasive species in parts of Africa, Australia, and most of the United States. Nonetheless, many people eat carp in different parts of the world.

Mirror carp, however, are commonly found in Europe. Their name comes from from their scales’ resemblance to mirrors. They can grow to weigh over 60 pounds. The last few British record fish have all been mirror carp.

Tiger Carp, of course, is just a nickname for the mirror carp with its black and orange stripes.

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