Massive Male Carpet Pythons Get Into Vicious Fight Over Female: VIDEO

by Emily Morgan
massive-male-carpet-pythons-get-into-vicious-fight-over-female-video
Photo by: artas

Two massive male carpet pythons were caught on film wrestling over a mate in a brutal battle.

Jake Stinson, who runs Jake’s Reptile Relocations, captured the viral moment in Queensland, Australia, and later shared it to TikTok.

In the clip, viewers watch as the pair of 10-foot snakes slither on the floor and go at one another viciously. “They were huge, about as long and definitely as thick as they ever get,” Stinson said to news outlets.

@jakethesnakecatcher How cool are these guys! This is what happens when to males who smell a female during breeding season run into each other on the way. Coastal carpet python male combat #python #pythons #australia #snake #snakes #snakecatcher #reptile #reptiles ♬ original sound – Jakethesnakecatcher

“It’s very cool to witness and mesmerizing to watch,” he said about the wild moment. “It sounds incredible too. They let out deep hisses throughout…. It sounds similar to a truck’s exhaust.”

According to Stinson, when they’re full-grown, these species are typically between 6 and 10 feet long. When these constrictors are in a battle, they might try to suffocate their opponent. However, due to the smoothness of their scales, they constantly slip out of each other’s grip.

“They can’t really injure the other, [they] just tire them out,” Stinson said. “They go at it for absolute hours, pushing each other’s heads down and gripping quite hard at times to subdue their opponent.”

The pythons get their names from their distinctive scale pattern, which looks like an oriental carpet. As for their coloring, they can range from green to black. Their patterns can also be beautifully unique, according to the Queensland Museum.

In addition, according to Stinson, these pythons are also one of the most popular snakes people keep as pets. While you’ll see them most across mainland Australia they’re also in Indonesia and Papua New Guinea. “It is believed one in three Queensland roofs have a python in it,” Stinson said.

Carpet Pythons use constrction rather than venom

The good news is carpet pythons are not venomous. Instead of using venom, they’re considered ambush predators that kill their prey by constriction.

“What kills them is actually cutting off the blood circulation to the brain,” Stinson said. They often eat rats and other vermin, so they perform a useful service to homeowners.

While you shouldn’t fear these snakes, there have been some instances of these breeds going after family pets. For example, last year, a large python killed a pet cat via suffocation in Buderim, Queensland. In addition, dogs, guinea pigs, and chickens have also fallen victim to these snakes., thanks to the pythons’ powerful coils.

However, the females are often much larger than the males, weighing up to four times as much. Experts say this is because females need to have large supplies of fat for their eggs. In order to keep the eggs warm, the female snake will coil herself around the nest and create heat with her muscle contractions.

Outsider.com