One of World’s Largest T. Rex Skeletons Up for Sale, Expected to Go for Millions

by Halle Ames
One-World's-Largest-T.-Rex-Skeletons-Up-Sale,-Expected-Go-Millions

Just think, you could be the lucky owner of a T. Rex skeleton. It could be a lovely statement piece for your entryway. The catch is that it might set you back a few million dollars.

One of the world’s most complete Tyrannosaurus Rex skeletons, named STAN, is up for sale. Christie’s in New York will be auctioning off the prehistoric beast on October 6. It is likely to sell for $6 to $8 million.

For the past two decades, STAN has called the Black Hills Institute in South Dakota home. Here, he has been studied and the topic of many papers.

Named after the paleontologist who discovered his bones, Stan Sacrisom, the T. Rex died in the Hell Creek Formation that stretches across parts of Montana, Wyoming, and the Dakotas in 1987.

T. Rex Skeleton

STAN was one of the top predators on Earth nearly 67 million years ago. In addition, he stood 13 feet high, 40 feet long, and also would have weighed around seven to eight tons. The skeleton consists of 188 bones, including 11-inch teeth, making it one of the largest and most complete T. Rex skeletons globally.

Researchers initially thought STAN was a Triceratops skeleton until 1992 when he was correctly identified and assembled. It took paleontologists more than 30,000 hours to dig up the T. Rex and assemble him.

Upon restoration of STAN’s skeleton, they found that he lived with a broken neck. STAN also suffered from numerous puncture wounds in his skull and rib.

“We are honored to be bringing STAN to auction and to have been entrusted with the stewardship of such an iconic and important T. rex,” said James Hyslop, head of scientific instruments, globes, and natural history at Christie’s.

Hyslop also added that STAN would be visible 24 hours a day through the windows at Christie’s Rockefeller Center.

“This special viewing opportunity will offer enthusiasts and pedestrians alike the chance to see and learn about one of the world’s most iconic dinosaurs in a socially distanced setting.”

[H/T CNN]

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