PHOTOS: Incredibly ‘Rare’ Roman Mosaic Depicting the Trojan War Discovered

by Lauren Boisvert
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(Photo by LOUAI BESHARA/AFP via Getty Images)

Archeologists in Syria uncovered a rare Roman-era mosaic depicting the Trojan War, according to a Wednesday, Oct. 12 report. Located in Rastan in Syria’s Homs district, the mosaic is one of the country’s most important archeological discoveries since the Syrian Civil War began in 2011. Incredibly detailed and intact, it’s an extraordinary find.

“What is in front of us is a discovery that is rare on a global scale,” said Dr. Humam Saad, the associate director of Excavation and Archaeological Research at Syria’s General Directorate of Antiquities and Museums.

According to reports, the mosaic is about 1,600 years old, potentially set in the floor of a bathhouse. The mosaic is possibly about 1,300 feet. But, archeologists currently uncovered only 65 feet. The artifact requires further excavation and study to determine more. Check out the photos of this amazing find.

A soldier watches as a mosaic floor dating to the Roman era is covered up after its discovery was announced by Syria’s General Directorate of Antiquities in the city of al-Rastan in Syria’s west-central province of Homs on October 12, 2022. – Syria revealed on October 12 a remarkably intact 1,600-year-old Roman-era mosaic including depictions of warriors in the Trojan War, with authorities hailing it as one of the “rarest” found. The mosaic is the latest to be found in Rastan, which the government seized back from rebels in 2018 after years of bloodshed. “It is not the oldest of its kind, but it’s the most complete and the rarest,” according to Syria’s General Directorate of Museums. (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA / AFP) (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA/AFP via Getty Images)

Rare Roman-Era Mosaic Uncovered in Syria Depicting Scenes from the Trojan War

“We can’t identify the type of the building, whether it’s a public bathhouse or something else, because we have not finished excavating yet,” said Saad.

The ancient mosaic depicts scenes from the Trojan War. This war occurred between the Greeks and the citizens of Troy more than 2,000 years ago. According to a report from the New York Post, part of the piece depicts Amazon warriors fighting alongside Trojan warriors. It also includes a scene of Hercules slaying Hippolyta, the Amazon queen. The mosaic also shows Neptune, god of the sea, with his 40 mistresses. What’s interesting about this piece: it identifies all the warriors’ names.

This picture taken on October 12, 2022 shows a view of a mosaic floor dating to the Roman era being excavated in the city of al-Rastan in Syria’s west-central province of Homs, after its discovery was announced by Syria’s General Directorate of Antiquities. (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA / AFP) (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA/AFP via Getty Images)

More Ancient Artifacts and Heritage Sites Remain Undiscovered in Syria

The Syrian government took the city of Rastan, where archeologists found the mosaic, back from rebels in 2018. The year before, the government caught groups trying to sell pieces of the mosaic on social media. The Nabu Museum in Lebanon had recently donated the property where archeologists uncovered the piece to the Syrian state. The property dates back to the 4th century, according to the New York Post report.

Journalists film at the site of the discovery announced by Syria’s General Directorate of Antiquities of a mosaic floor dating to the Roman era being excavated in the city of al-Rastan in Syria’s west-central province of Homs on October 12, 2022. (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA / AFP) (Photo by LOUAI BESHARA/AFP via Getty Images)

Syrian actress and member of the Nabu Museum’s board of trustees Sulaf Fawakherji said that she hopes the museum will purchase and donate other ancient sites in the area.

“There are other buildings, and it’s clear that the mosaic extends far wider,” Fawakherji said. “Rastan historically is an important city, and it could possibly be a very important heritage city for tourism.”

Definitely a monumental find for the country, which will take many expert hands to uncover completely. So far, archeologists have only excavated the mosaic in part, but this isn’t the type of thing to rush.

Outsider.com