Texas Hunter Takes Down Jacked 160-Pound Mountain Lion

by Halle Ames
Texas-Hunter-Down-Jacked-160-Pound-Mountain-Lion

A Texas hunter shot and killed a massive mountain lion when it approached his stand on Saturday while deer hunting.

A game warden in Celeste, Texas, says a nearly six-foot-long, 160-pound male mountain lion might have been the same one spotted a few weeks ago further south. News 12 reports that the huge cat was approaching the hunter in his stand on Saturday afternoon when the hunter shot and killed the mountain lion.

Randolph McGee, the game warden involved, said that while we’re not on the menu for mountain lions, deer are.

“It’s really unique up here in north Texas. We’re just simply not in their range,” McGee said, according to News 12’s Mike Rogers. “They’re designed to take down large game, but their main diet is deer meat.”

Texas Mountain Lions

The animals live in mountainous regions, as their name suggests. However, there is one species of mountain lion that lives in the El Paso area, the opposite end of the state.

The elusive creatures try to avoid contact with humans. In fact, until this incident on Saturday, the most recent sighting in Texoma was on October 19 in Pushmataha County.

“The thing was out there trying to survive and live, trying to get him a meal,” McGee said.

McGee also believes this mountain lion was the same one spotted several weeks ago on surveillance video. Numerous residents in Rowlett say they had seen the big cat. Many news sources and residences speculate it is the same cat caught in this footage:

McGee asks any person who sees or shoots one of these cats to call the game wardens. However, this is the first time he has ever seen one killed.

“One thing we ask people to do if they harvest something like this is ‘hey give us a call,’” McGee said. “We kind of want to check it out, and I know our wildlife biologists took some DNA out of this.”

In Texas, mountain lions are considered non-game animals, so anyone with a valid Texas hunting license can kill the animal.

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