Tourists Risk Getting Attacked by Big Black Bear at Yellowstone National Park: VIDEO

by Sean Griffin
tourists-risk-getting-attacked-big-black-bear-yellowstone-national-park-video
(Photo via Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images).

Tourists at Yellowstone National Park risked getting mauled by a black bear after a large group of them blocked the road and crowded near the animal.

The video below depicts a bear walking across a two-lane road in the park. The traffic is backed because of the amount of tourists who left the cars to get a closer look at the bear.

As the bear crosses the road, tourists are seen rushing toward it to snap photos and observe. The bear swipes its head left and right, and a few people scurry away from the bear. However, it crosses the road to the other side of the woods. Then, the video ends.

Luckily, the black bear didn’t decide to attack any of the tourists mere feet away.

Plenty of commenters took to Instagram to voice their complaints about the tourists of Yellowstone National Park.

“Do these people know about zoos?” one user asked. “Go there if you want pics and stay out of national parks, please!”

“You better run,” one person wrote. “The bear will run after a free meal.”

“Even if it doesn’t attack and acts scared, DON’T CROWD THE ANIMALS!” one person wrote.

Another user said: “The blocking the road is equally as infuriating.”

“It’s like this in the smoky mountains,” a final user wrote. “The blocking the road is the worst n it’s only one lane. Idk if folks are naturally foolish or never seen a bear.”

Black Bear Cub Tranquilized by Oregon Authorities After Roaming Neighborhood

A black bear cub ran through the town of Bend, Oregon on earlier last month. The bear was discovered on at a city facility. Then, it was transported to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife who then tranquilized the bear. Eventually, after they performing checks on the bear cub, it will be released back into a suitable habitat in the Deschutes National Forest.

The male bear, which is approximately 7-8 months old, would have been born in late winter around January or February, ODFW said.

Most cubs still live with its mother at 7-8 months old. However, these cubs are capable of surviving independently in the wild, according to the department.

“It is unclear why the bear was separated from its mother prematurely,” ODFW’s statement said, adding that they haven’t received any reports of a dead mother.

“We have no reports of damage associated with this bear, so it’s likely the young bear just got confused and wandered into town,” said Andrew Walch, ODFW’s Deschutes district wildlife biologist.  

ODFW tranquilized the bear after being alerted by the Bend Police Department. The bear had wandered into the 62000 block of Boyd Acres Road. It was also seen Tuesday afternoon and evening around NE 18th Street and Cooley Road. 

“We are glad we were able to get this young bear back to the wild and thank the Bend Police Department for their assistance and the public for alerting us to the bear,” Walch stated. “The young bear is in good physical condition, which should increase its survival chances.” 

Outsider.com