WATCH: Here’s What Happens When You Leave a Pizza in the Woods

by Madison Miller
watch-heres-what-happens-when-you-leave-pizza-woods

When a tree falls in the woods and no one hears it, did it even make a sound? If a pizza is left in the woods, will it even be eaten?

Both are questions that have long been considered. Now, we may have the answer to at least one of these questions.

On Ace Vlogs, Ace went ahead and bought three different pizzas to share with the woodland creatures to see what would happen.

Red Baron Pizza

The first pizza was a cheaper Red Baron frozen supreme pizza. He cooked it and left it in the middle of the woods. However, he also set up different trail cameras to get a sense of what was going on behind-the-scenes.

“It’s a supreme, which I think the forest critters will love because it has meats and vegetables on it … I want all the animals to be able to share,” Ace said as he cut the pizza into triangles on the forest floor.

He put spikes through the pieces of pizza so they’d have to work harder to grab it. Two of the slices did not have any spikes, to provide an easy grab.

He cuts to his nighttime footage and his first customer is very expectantly a raccoon, notably called the trash panda. The raccoon eats all the pizza, even scavenging for lost pieces of pepperoni.

The camera also picks up on a coyote in the distance, but it doesn’t go near the pizza. A deer peeks into the camera frame, stares at the pizza in confusion, and leaves.

“It’s just funny the different personalities, how some are really bold … and others are really suspicious and cautious,” Ace said.

Finally, in the morning, a black bear shows up at the scene of the pizza only to discover he missed the party. Ace is bummed since in his last video a bear missed out on the opportunity as well.

Pizza Hut and Dessert

Ace returns back the next day to check the damage and set up his new pizza feast. This time, it’s a Pizza Hut meat lover’s pizza.

He sets it up the same way and takes a look at the trail cameras. This time, no one grabs a slice. Woodland creatures must be objective in their pizza taste and prefer the cheap stuff.

“Is it a Pizza Hut thing? … It’s meat lover’s!” Ace said.

However, the next day he leaves the meat lover’s pizza and adds a blueberry dessert pizza next to it. During the night, a possum comes to chow down. Then, a swarm of raccoons finishes off both pizzas, leaving nothing.

There were no sightings of smaller animals like chipmunks or squirrels feasting. Deer were too skittish to ever go for it. Bears are always late to the party.

Moral of the story: “If you leave pizza, they will come.”

Feeding Woodland Creatures

While the thought of leaving a pizza for woodland creatures is fun and entertaining, doing it too much can be harmful.

According to the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, there can be a number of problems that come out of feeding wild animals. The most prominent is directly feeding the animals face-to-face, which is not at all what happened in the video.

If people do this it can lead to many animals in one place. This can increase the chances of disease transmission for both humans and animals. Also, if animals become accustomed to people they can then lose their inherent fear of people. This can either cause them to become aggressive or begin to lose some of their natural survival skills.

Additionally, human food is not healthy for wild animals. They have particularly specialized diets and can become easily malnourished or sick with the wrong food. Animals also can’t tell the difference between packaging and food, which can be life-threatening.

In some places, it is even illegal to feed wildlife. For example, according to Colorado Parks & Wildlife, it is illegal to feed big-game animals in Colorado. “Human food” can stop a wild animal’s digestive system, causing it to get sick and die. They need native vegetation to live.

But, we can’t blame the critters for chowing down on some pizza when left around. Free pizza is always a yes– especially when enjoyed in the great outdoors.

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