WATCH: Maine Woman Catches Great White Shark Shredding Apart Porpoise in Chilling Clip

by Sean Griffin
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A family visiting islands in Casco Bay in Maine last Friday saw something they’ve “never seen anything like” before. What they saw was a great white shark shredding a porpoise near Cliff Island.

Kasey Lyn Watkins started videoing the scene when her 8-year-old daughter, Kali, saw the young shark pursue its porpoise carcass.

“Thanks to citizen scientists Kasey Lyn Watkins and family for sending me info about their amazing sighting,” said John Chisholm, a shark biologist. Chisholm runs the social media account “MA Sharks.” Watkins reported the scene to the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy’s Sharktivity app.

Over a dozen sightings were seen off the coast of Cape Cod last weekend, with large numbers reported elsewhere.

“It’s a good reminder that white sharks occur off Maine and they don’t just eat seals,” Chisholm said.

Watkins, 35, said the family was heading to Boothbay for the weekend. They were about to leave Casco Bay around 2:40 p.m.

That’s when she heard her daughter yell “that she just saw a shark come out of the water and eat something.”

The family looked out to the water and realized the shark was eating a porpoise, and “was still coming back for more,” Watkins said.

Watkins Says She Was ‘Stoked’ to Witness Shark Feeding

The incident happened near Bailey Island in Harpswell. This is the same spot where a woman was killed by a white shark almost two years ago.

It was Maine’s first recorded fatal shark attack. The incident led to more safety protocols and also increased research efforts about the presence of sharks along Maine’s coastline.

While people typically associate great whites with Cape Cod, the sighting was not the first reported in Maine this summer.

In July, a person recorded the aftermath of a seal’s attack off Pemaquid Point in Bristol. Later that month, a woman took multiple photos of a shark feeding on its prey near the Whitehead Island Lighthouse.

“Remember, if you are lucky enough to see a white shark please report it,” Chisholm said. “You can use the Sharktivity app or, if [you’re in Maine], you can also use the [Department of Marine Resources] shark sighting report page.”

The shark was believed to be less than 10 feet in length. Watkins said a scientist from the Atlantic White Shark Conservancy told her it’s “very unusual” to see a white shark of that size and age eating marine animals such as a porpoise rather. Normally, great white sharks of this ages sticks its normal diet of mostly fish.

“I’m guessing it scared this [porpoise] away from its pod, because whenever we see porpoises out there, they’re in big pods and there was no other porpoises around,” she said.

She said family members were “stoked” to see a shark up close, because they’re “big fans of ‘Shark Week.’ ”

“It was awesome to see,” she said.

Outsider.com