WATCH: Moose Gets Tangled in Volleyball Net, Wildlife Officers Come to the Rescue

by Megan Molseed
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(Getty Images)

A bull moose found itself tangled up in a precarious situation recently. This comes after the large animal found itself all wrapped up in an outdoor volleyball net. Thankfully, officials were able to free the trapped wild animal. Sending it off on its way once freed from the net.

Recently, officers from the Colorado Parks and Wildlife responded to the town of Breckenridge to help free the moose who had gotten tangled in an outdoor volleyball net. Photos posted by officials to the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Twitter page show how tightly wrapped the net was around the moose’s antlers when officials arrived.

“Sometimes we all need a little extra help,” the recent Twitter post depicting the rescue points out.

“Wildlife officers helped free a young bull moose tangled in a volleyball net in Breckenridge earlier today,” the Twitter update continues.

“Officers stood by helping the moose stay upright to aid in breathing,” the message notes. “while the effects of the drugs used to sedate him wore off.”

Thankfully, as a follow-up video posted to the Twitter post shows us, this “young bull moose was able to stand up and walk away.”

Large Animals Such As Moose, Elk, or Deer Are Vulnerable In Stressful Situations Such As This One

This moose faced a very stressful moment as its antlers were wrapped tightly in the volleyball net. Thankfully, officials were able to respond quickly to the situation. Taking care to help free the animal with zero injuries to the moose, area residents, or rescuers.

During the cooler months leading up into the winter and through early spring animals such as this moose, elk, or deer rely on the body fat they have stored during the warmer months. And, because of this, the animals often have little energy to spare as the weather gets cooler.

“Consequently, they have few calories to spare,” notes the Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials in an earlier news release warning about these hazards.

“They are especially vulnerable in stressful situations,” the statement adds. Experts recommend removing tangle hazards. Some of these hazards include hammocks, hanging lights, and volleyball nets from yards to prevent an emergency such as this one. Thankfully, this moose was able to walk away from the incident. However, the animal was slightly disoriented as it walked away.

Officials warn residents to never approach a trapped animal if they see one tangled like this moose was. If you see an animal tangled somewhere or stuck they should not approach, but contact officials instead.

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