WATCH: Wild Video Shows Blacktip Shark Attacking Boat Engines

by Suzanne Halliburton
watch-wild-video-shows-blacktip-shark-attacking-boat-engines
Auscape/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Silly blacktip shark. Nothing good comes from attacking a boat engine.

Check out this video posted from the account BlackTipH. The caption: “When sharks eat your engines instead of the bait.”

There were all sorts of fun theories as to why this particular blacktip shark decided to go for the motor. One account follower wrote: “That’s him letting you know you’re in his house.” Another replied “A whole new meaning to motor boating.”

Another person felt bad for the shark (wouldn’t you?) “Kinda sad. I know there is not much you can do about it but them props are sharp.”

So, if you’re curious about blacktip sharks, we’ll give you some facts. Yes, they really do have a black fin, you can see it slicing through the water. And experts say they’re usually timid. So it is surprising to see a blacktip shark attack a motor. That’s certainly not timid behavior.

The blacktip sharks usually hang out together by gender. They grow to about 55 pounds, with a length of 5.5 feet. Females actually are bigger than the males. The biggest blacktip ever recorded was a female. And she was 6.8 feet long.

Let’s go back to the Instagram account. BlackTipH shared another crazy photo of this type of shark. Here’s the caption: “Not many fish attack topwater lures as aggressively as a blacktip shark!” Note that you can see the shark jump out of the water. They’re known to do that, often rotating as many as three times.

A Florida man recently recorded a really cool video of this same kind of shark feasting on mullet.

Paul Dabill, who lives in Palm Beach, Fla. used a drone to capture a better look at the feeding frenzy.

Here’s how Dabill described the blacktip shark experiences to Outdoor Life:

“It’s a very exciting and very dramatic thing to watch. [The mullet] are typically very close to the beach, and a lot of predators come in and try to eat them.”

You can understand why the sharks go for the smaller fish. We’re still perplexed by trying to eat the motor.

Outsider.com