Yellowstone National Park Sets September Record for Attendance Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

by Thad Mitchell
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Despite the COVID-19 pandemic’s best effort, recent reports suggest people are still visiting Yellowstone National Park in record numbers.

In the month of September, Yellowstone National Park saw one of its busiest months on record, according to East Idaho News. Park officials say 837,499 recreational visitors came in September. The report states that number is a 21% increase over September 2019, making it the busiest September on the park’s books.

The 3,500 square mile park is one of the most visited National Parks in the country. Located primarily in Wyoming, Yellowstone also takes up space in Idaho and Montana as well. Yellowstone is most noted for its dramatic canyons, alpine rivers, lush forests, hot springs, and gushing geysers, including its most famous, Old Faithful, according to the park’s website. The park is also home to diverse wildlife including bears, large bison, elk, and antelope.

Yellowstone National Park Sets September Record, But Attendance Is Down Overall

Despite the September surge in attendance, overall park visitation is down for Yellowstone. In a press release, park staff says they have 3,383,872 recreation visits so far in 2020. That figure is down 11 percent through the same period in 2019, which saw 3,807,815 recreation visits.

The park closed its doors in late March due to COVID-19 related health and safety concerns. Entrances to the park began reopening in the summer. Despite the reopening, park officials continue to urge enhanced safety precautions to its visitors.

Atop the park’s primary web page, is a warning to all visitors regarding limiting the spread of coronavirus.

“Recreate responsibly and reduce the spread of COVID-19,” the park’s press release says. “If you are sick, do not visit the park. Self-quarantine to avoid exposing others. Services are limited in the park. Stay informed about changes to park operations by visiting the park’s website and social media pages.”

[H/T: East Idaho News]

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