WATCH: Bald Eagle Swims to Shore of Wisconsin Lake With Massive Carp in Its Talons

by Amanda Glover
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In a video post, a Wisconsin bald eagle swims to the shore of a Wisconsin lake while holding a carp in its talons. It looks like these magnificent creatures aren’t just skilled in flying.

Am I the only one who didn’t know these birds could swim? The way the bird moved its wings is so clean and graceful. But that grace only lasted until it made it to the shore. The event only got more interesting after the bald eagle stepped onto the grass while holding a huge carp—it was still alive!

You can watch the video here.

Viewers of this event didn’t hold back their shock. “Look at that big a– f–king fish!” one of them exclaimed. “Holy s–t!”

The more the bird moved, the more clear the fish became. The eagle sat comfortably on the grass while the fish struggled beneath it. The eagle later stood up and extended its wings, making viewers think it planned to take off again. But sadly, the video cut off at 1:07. Therefore, we can only assume the bald eagle made the carp its lunch that day.

Although many viewers enjoyed the video, several others found its angle quite frustrating. One YouTube user said, “Why is it so hard to just point the camera at what you’re recording and keep it there?” Another user chose to look past the camera work and crack a joke. “When your hungry anything is possible,” they said.

Is it Normal for Bald Eagles to Swim With Their Food?

In case you guys thought it was odd for bald eagles to swim holding food like carp, it’s actually not that rare. Back in November 2021, the Nature Is Metal Instagram page got a hold of a clip of one bald eagle doing a breaststroke in Alaska while holding a fish in its talons. The page also educated viewers on how well the creatures can swim. “For the most part, bald eagles are masters in the art of open water foraging,” the post read.

Although bald eagles don’t dive directly to their food, they have their ways of getting to their breakfast. “They’ll wait until their soon-to-be devoured quarry get close to the surface before they swoop down and snatch them up,” the post continues. But how much do these birds actually swim?

The Daily Mail reported that swimming might be bald eagles’ only option if their feathers get waterlogged. They’re at a disadvantage when swimming, and sometimes they even drown.

“Throughout the years, I’ve seen them swim a lot of times,” Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife researcher Jim Watson said. “And usually it’s because they fly out and attempt to catch a fish in the water and maybe get waterlogged.”

These animals used to be at risk for extinction. However, in 2007, officials took the American bald eagle off the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife.

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