WATCH: Hunters Catch Bobcat Stealing Meal From Hanging Deer Carcass in Trail Cam Video

by Amy Myers
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This bobcat decided to let a couple of deer hunters do the hard work for it and keep the scraps for itself. After field-dressing a deer, the hunters decided to hang the remains from a bear rope to ensure that no unwanted scavengers found their way to camp. But apparently, the rope was a little too low.

On a nearby trail cam, the hunters caught the bobcat standing on its hind legs as it reached up with its claws to secure its dinner. It took some patience in order to scrape some meat off the bones. At one point, the wild cat even had its back paws on the base of the tree trunk to gain a few more inches. Further in the video, you can see his feet completely off the ground as he chomped on the remainder of the deer.

Once he figured out the tactic, he stuck with the method. But of course, it wasn’t the easiest position to hold. When the bobcat fell, it seemed to have to take a moment to regroup and give itself a pep talk before trying again.

Bobcat in Trail Cam Video Claws at Deer Remains for 16 Hours

The video was taken last September from 4:26 p.m. to 8 a.m. the next morning. The bobcat worked tirelessly for nearly 16 hours to get as much deer meat as he could in the video. It was a cold night, but the wild cat didn’t give up.

Now that’s dedication.

“Some hunters last fall tracked down a wildlife officer & said something had eaten on a deer they harvested,” the video’s creator shared. “They had tied it higher and something still got to it. The wildlife officer set a trail camera on it and hung some of the meat a little lower. This bobcat turned out to be the culprit. The wildlife officer reported the hunters enjoyed the pictures so much that they seemed ok with the whole situation after all.”

Bobcat Caught Sneaking up on Its Prey

This encounter isn’t unlike the stealthy bobcat that stalked a deer and managed to pounce on it from just a few feet away. The attack is pretty remarkable, considering how alert deer and woodland prey animals are. Still, the bobcat managed to get within spitting distance of the animal, and well, we know the rest.

Meanwhile, in the comments of the Reddit post, fellow hunters and outdoor enthusiasts wondered why the deer didn’t hear, see or smell the bobcat at such a close distance.

“Was the deer listening to a podcast?” one person joked.

“Really speaks to the stealth of the bobcat,” said another.

Others spoke to how some deer (likely more suburban deer), tend to be more oblivious to their surroundings.

“Unless you’ve got your rifle and you’re looking for them. Then they’re 3 sheets to the wind the moment you spit them,” one hunter wrote.

Sigh, don’t we know it.

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