Watch Hurricane Ida Eye of the Storm Video Before It Makes Landfall

by Shelby Scott
watch-hurricane-ida-eye-storm-video-before-makes-landfall

Meteorologists, broadcast media, and public officials have kept American citizens updated on Hurricane Ida’s approach with regular reports trending since Friday. Now, as Ida made landfall on Louisiana’s coast, take a look at the eye’s approach prior.

Churning out intense 150-mile-per-hour max winds and deadly storm surges, Hurricane Ida promises landfall will bring much destruction.

The above clip captured Ida’s approach much earlier this morning. At this point, Hurricane Ida was still 50 miles from the southern state’s coast. Since, Ida has crashed into the Louisiana coast, taking root in Port Fourchon, LA.

According to an NBC live broadcast, Hurricane Ida made landfall in Louisiana less than an hour ago. Already, the state reported more than 122,000 power outages. So far, Ida remains at a Category 4 hurricane, maxing out with 150-mile-per-hour wind speeds. Now that the hurricane has made landfall, meteorologists expect Ida to weaken. Though it does not mean that southern state residents are any safer than they’ve been.

Despite the hurricane’s recent landfall, National Weather Service Meteorologist Jennifer McNatt said, “Everybody in the path of Ida should be prepared for very heavy rainfall, very strong winds, [a] life-threatening storm surge along the coast and isolated tornadoes as well.”

Louisiana Highways Remain Clogged During Hurricane Ida’s Landfall

The NBC article further said since all Sunday flights from New Orleans remain grounded, people rushed to flee the state by car.

What resulted saw tens of thousands of vehicles trapped on state highways amid Ida’s approach. McNatt encouraged drivers to watch out for flash flooding as it poses major risks to exposed drivers. She explained, “There’s a lot of people that drive onto flooded roads and it causes them to be swept off the roads.”

Earlier this morning, officials claimed Hurricane Ida may categorize as one of the biggest storms in Louisiana since the 1800s. Traffic remains slow and unyielding at the moment. Regardless, we can’t help but sympathize with fleeing southern Americans rushing to get out of Hurricane Ida’s path.

Many Americans attempted, and are still attempting, to escape the hurricane’s wrath. However, business owners, shop owners, and homeowners made efforts to board up their homes against potential destruction. Some have instead chosen to wait out the storm at home among clogged roadways.

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards said the state holds in reserve 600 people and teams from across 15 different U.S. states awaiting instruction to perform search and rescues. For now, however, government officials have told those who’ve decided to stay to prepare to ride out Hurricane Ida’s wind and rain for the next 72 hours without help.

“We’re as ready as we can be,” he shared. “It’s going to be a very very challenging storm.”

Outsider.com