Ohio Volunteers to Plant Over 100 Trees in Tornado-Damaged Areas

by Samantha Whidden
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(Photo by Matthew Hatcher/Getty Images)

A little over three years after the 2019 Memorial Day tornadoes caused devastation across the Dayton, Ohio area, a group of volunteers is now replanting trees that were destroyed during the storms. 

According to WHIO, volunteers with Keep America Beautiful’s RETREET program are planning to plant more than 100 trees in areas that were impacted by the Memorial Day tornadoes. Each of the trees is free of charge and will be placed at home in Trotwood, Harrison Township, and Old North Dayton. The work done by the volunteers is planned to be completed within five years. To date, the program has replanted approximately 6,301 native and noninvasive trees. 

Cincinnati.com reported that during the May 27th and 28th outbreaks, 19 tornadoes were recorded to touch down in Ohio. This included an EF4. This set a state record for the most tornadoes produced by a single weather event. Although no one was killed in the Dayton area, an 81-year-old man died in Celina. Storm storms hit a number of communities including Celina, Brookville, Beavercreek, Trotwood, and Riverside.

Following the series of tornadoes, thousands of people were displaced as well as businesses were destroyed. Fran O’Shaughnessy, a Red Cross volunteer spoke about her experience one year later. She stated that the response in the Dayton community and Beavercreek area was just remarkable. “I’m very proud. I’m proud of how well everyone stepped up to help.” 

Recovery Efforts Continued One Year After the 2019 Memorial Day Tornadoes

Former Dayton Mayor and Ohio Governor candidate Nan Whaley also stated that her strongest memories of the night of storms were the pure devastation and how gracious people were. However, after one year, the recovery was still ongoing. “You can see the light at the end of the tunnel here. That’s not to say that some people’s lives won’t be completely different in the time before and time after. There are parts of our community that will never be the same because of the tornadoes.” 

Following the tornadoes, The Dayton Foundation set up a fund to help with the relief and recovery. More than 37,000 donations were made and over $2.2 Fillion has been donated. $1.2 million has been distributed to emergency responses. 

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