HomeSportsArmy Beats Navy in Rivalry’s First-Ever Overtime Finish

Army Beats Navy in Rivalry’s First-Ever Overtime Finish

by Dustin Schutte
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(Photo by Edward Diller/Getty Images)

The official end of the college football regular season ended in epic fashion. For the first time in the historic rivalry between Army and Navy, the game went into overtime.

Army came out on top of the latest smash-mouth, old-school football rivalry, taking down Navy 20-17 in extra frames. The two teams were knotted at 10-10 through 60 minutes, needing a pair of overtimes to settle the score.

On the first play of overtime, Army’s Markel Johnson ran 25 yards to the endzone to give the Black Knights a 17-10 advantage. The Midshipmen responded, with Xavier Arline completing a 25-yard touchdown pass to Maquel Haywood on Navy’s next possession.

As Navy drove towards the goal line on their following possession, Anton Hall Jr. fumbled the ball at the 1-yard line. Army recovered the football and was able to set up a game-winning field goal attempt.

Quinn Maretzki drilled a 39-yarder to secure the thrilling victory.

With the victory, Army improved to 6-6 on the season. Navy ended the 2022 campaign with a 4-8 record.

Triple-Option Dominates Army-Navy Again

Would you expect anything different? Both head coaches — Ken Niumatalolo (Navy) and Jeff Monken (Army) — have enjoyed tremendous success running the triple option. Why change anything for the final game of the year?

Although NASCAR star Denny Hamlin had some questions about this type of approach, it’s just what the two teams do. Navy ended the game with 259 yards on the ground while Army put up 125. The two teams combined to complete just three passes for a grand total of 53 yards.

Most teams rack up 53 passing yards on one play in a game.

But this unique style of offense only adds to the level of intrigue with this game. It’s not something we see very often, and it puts college football fans everywhere in a bit of a time portal back to the ground-and-pound days of the sport.

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