Buffalo Bills Rookie Linemen Serenade Team with Naked Rendition of Backstreet Boys Classic

by Patrick Norton
buffalo-bills-rookie-linemen-serenade-team-naked-rendition-backstreet-boys

For the Buffalo Bills, protecting quarterback Josh Allen – the fire of the organization – is everybody’s one desire. Believe when I say, they want it that way.

As training camp roars on and the NFL season nears, one tradition never goes out of style: playful rookie hazing. Nothing harmful, nothing illegal, but enough to cause some minor embarrassment and a room full of laughter.

Position groups faced the spotlight at Bills camp today, showcasing hidden talents in front of the rest of the team. Rookie protectors Tanner Owen and Alec Anderson stole the show, going shirtless and signing Backstreet Boys’ I Want It That Way. Alternating lyrics like the infamous cold-open from NBC’s Brooklyn Nine-Nine, the linemen sing their hearts out to the jovial audience.

Allen – shaken by the pure talent – mimicked a lighter with his cellphone’s flashlight. The rest of the players in the meeting clapped a beat. However, the rookie crooners displayed difficulty in keeping up. But the quarterback loves a bit of humor, never appearing Larger Than Life.

After tripping on his own shoelaces, Allen faked an unconscious state. Meanwhile, his linemen probably asked the Buffalo Bills star to Quit Playing Games with their hearts.

For the rookies busy serenading their teammates, it’s a harmless moment nobody in that room forgets. Maybe with the help of a music teacher, these boys could become America’s next heartthrob; paging my sister-in-law.

But looking back at the things they’ve done, they were trying to be someone. As long as they play their part – keeping Allen out of the dirt – these lineman could show the quarterback the shape of a Lombardi Trophy.

Everybody, Buffalo Bills are Back, All Right!

Oh my God, they’re back again. Losing Brian Daboll to the New York Giants shouldn’t drastically impact the effectiveness of Buffalo’s exciting offense. While the change in play calling could feel odd out of the gate for Allen, the scheme should appear nearly identical. Play to the strengths, chuck the ball downfield to Dawson Knox or Stefon Diggs, and profit.

The Bills missed a shot at the AFC Championship game in last year’s heart-pounding overtime playoff loss to the Kansas City Chiefs. Offensive potency rendering both defenses utterly useless forced Buffalo to splurge on the pass rush, signing Von Miller.

However, Knox doesn’t read too much into the critiques of the team’s offseason, setting the bar high thank to Josh Allen. Last month, the tight end suggested, “there’s nothing [Allen] can’t do.”

Outsider.com