WATCH: Dallas Cowboys Owner Jerry Jones Signs Fan’s Baby at Training Camp

by Bryan Fyalkowski
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When Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones was signing autographs on Monday after the team’s training camp, he must have been in Ricky Bobby mode. When a woman held up her baby, he just went ahead and signed the youngster.

Of course, Ricky Bobby in Talladega Nights signed a baby’s forehead, while Jones autographed the baby’s No. 1 Cowboys jersey. Either way, it was a hilarious scene, and something you would not imagine an NFL team owner doing.

Jones is trying to gain back some public affection after using an offensive term for little people while speaking with reporters last week. The Litte People of America released a statement to TMZ regarding Jones’ comments and asked him to apologize. He did – sort of – later that day.

“I made a reference which I understand may have been viewed as offensive,” he said, via NBC Sports. “And I apologize.”

Jerry Jones’ Dallas Cowboys Franchise Valued at $7.64 Billion

Sportico has named the most valuable franchises across American sports, and Jerry Jones’ team tops the list. The Cowboys lead the way with a $7.64 billion valuation, which is a whopping $630 million ahead of the second-place New York Yankees.

Jones bought the team for $150 million in 1989. Since then, the Cowboys have revolutionized how NFL teams run their businesses. The franchise coined the term “America’s Team” and jumped on sponsorship opportunities. Dallas had handled its own merchandise business, launched Legends, built AT&T Stadium and opened “The Star” – a $1.5 billion practice facility and mixed-use development in Frisco, Texas.

Following the Cowboys and Yankees are the NBA’s New York Knicks ($6.12 billion) and Golden State Warriors ($6.03 billion). However, the NFL boasts 18 of the top 25 most valuable franchises. Every single one of the 32 NFL franchises is worth at least $2.84 billion.

“There isn’t anybody that compares to the NFL in sports or entertainment,” George Pyne – founder of the investment firm Bruin Capital – told Sportico. “They are in an orbit all by themselves.”

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