LOOK: Denny McCarthy Cards Unique ‘Hole-in-One’ By Landing Golf Ball in Cupholder

by Dustin Schutte
denny-mccarthy-cards-unique-hole-in-one-by-landing-golf-ball-cupholder

Call it a “hole-in-one” if you’d like, but we might have to find a new term for Denny McCarthy’s unique — yet impressive — feat on Sunday.

During the final round of the PGA Tour’s FedEx St. Jude Championship, McCarthy made a “splash” after launching a drive into the crowd. That’s not uncommon, but what made the shot so incredible? The golf ball bounced off a patron and into the cupholder on a folding chair.

That, alone, is a pretty impressive accomplishment.

Of course, it doesn’t count for anything. It’s a funny story in a sport that makes no sense. But McCarthy didn’t let this unique opportunity pass him by. He took full advantage.

Turn away, weekend golfers, but McCarthy turned that shot into a birdie. Seriously.

No, McCarthy didn’t have to play the ball as it lied (shoutout to Shooter McGavin), but instead received a free drop. He then plopped his second shot onto the green and putted in for the birdie.

It’s hard enough for me to get a birdie with a few mulligans on each hole. This just seems ridiculous.

McCarthy finished the final round shooting an even 70. For the tournament, he carded an 8-under-par to finish in the Top 20.

Always Keep Your Eyes Peeled in the Crowd

Professional golfers are the best at their craft, but that doesn’t mean they don’t make mistakes. Denny McCarthy isn’t the first PGA Tour member to launch a golf ball into the crowd. He won’t be the last, either.

During the Open Championship, four-time major winner Rory McIlroy left a PGA Tour worker injured after an errant drive. The ball struck the employee in the hand, resulting in a hospital trip and a sling.

Charlie Kane suffered a fractured hand after McIlroy’s off-course drive struck him. It didn’t keep Kane out of St. Andrews for long, though, as he took photos from the course the next day.

So, just remember golf fans, always keep your eyes peeled while attending an event. Not every shot will land in the fairway.

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