Green Bay Packers’ Aaron Rodgers Gives Update Regarding Team’s Young Wide Receivers

by Chris Haney
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Things seem to be calming down in Green Bay after quarterback Aaron Rodgers recently ripped into the team’s young wide receivers for their inconsistent performances. After losing Pro Bowler Davante Adams to the Las Vegas Raiders this offseason, Rodgers is expecting the rest of the receivers to step up. On Monday, Rodgers shared a positive update and seemed pleased by the group’s progress this preseason.

A trio of Packers rookie receivers have steadily improved since Green Bay selected them in the 2022 NFL Draft. Fourth-rounder Romeo Doubs has caught touchdowns in two straight preseason games. Additionally, second-rounder Christian Watson has gotten off to a hot start after returning from a knee injury in training camp. Plus, seventh-rounder Samori Toure has made significant strides as well, so things are looking up in Green Bay.

“I feel like the offense – especially in the last week or so – has been clicking closer to where I think we should be trending,” Rodgers said on Monday, according to ESPN.

The Packers are also relying on veterans Randall Cobb, Allen Lazard, and Sammy Watkins to hold down the receiving core. None of the rookies have caught passes from Aaron Rodgers this preseason. The Super Bowl-winning QB hasn’t played in the first two preseason matchups. Further, he didn’t participate in offseason OTAs. However, Rodgers doesn’t think his absence at OTAs will make a difference going forward.

“You know, not really,” Rodgers said. “Training camp is a long experience. There’s plenty of time for conversations, for practice, for a lot of the things they expect them to do in the regular season. I rely on the coaching staff to pass on the message as we’re learning the offense. And then I’m kind of the 202 professor. They’ve got to get kind of the base concepts. And when I come in, we have the offense outside of the paper offense.”

Aaron Rodgers Changes Tune Since Sharing Harsh WR Criticism

It seems like Aaron Rodgers has done a 180° turn since sharing harsh comments early last week that led to a team meeting. The 38-year-old didn’t hold back when addressing reporters about what he was seeing out of Green Bay’s wide receivers.

“It’s unfortunately some of the same guys,” Rodgers said at the time, according to the New York Post. “Repeat mistakes [are] a problem, so we’ve just got to clean those things up a little bit. The young guys, especially young receivers, we’ve got to be way more consistent. A lot of drops, a lot of bad route decisions, running the wrong route. We’ve got to get better in that area.”

While speaking to reporters on Monday, Rodgers praised some of his wide receivers for their individual performances. The QB had yet to practice with Watkins this offseason who just came off of the injury list. Yet the pair worked together recently to get Watkins caught up, and Rodgers spoke highly of the veteran’s willingness to learn.

“I feel like there’s been a few guys who’ve made a jump mentally,” Aaron Rodgers said. “Sammy [Watkins] being one of them, I feel like he’s been playing faster and making more precise decisions… It’s those little things like that start to gain that trust and that confidence and gets you excited about things.”

Rodgers also shared positive thoughts about rookie Romeo Doubs. The team is setting high standards for the first-year NFL receiver, especially because of his solid preseason to date.

“Now Doubs has done a lot of really nice things,” Rodgers said of the rookie. “But I think the standard for him is not going to be maybe the standard for a normal rookie we’ve had here in the past. Especially in the past four or five years, because he’s going to be expected to play based on his performance so far in camp. So we’ve got to hold him to a standard that I know he’s capable of reaching. But he cares about it, he’s a great kid, he’s made some instinctual plays that you just can’t really coach.”

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