HomeSportsNHL Fan Reportedly Has Part of Finger Bitten Off in Gruesome Brawl

NHL Fan Reportedly Has Part of Finger Bitten Off in Gruesome Brawl

by Dustin Schutte
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(Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)

Who would’ve thought that a fight in the stands could be more dangerous than the ones inside the rink? One NHL fan learned the hard way during last week’s Bruins-Coyotes game, losing part of his finger in a wild brawl.

The fight unfolded during the Friday night game at Mullett Arena in Tempe amongst fans. Pete Blackburn of Bally Sports shared video of the massive brawl that took place in the crowd.

One individual, later identified as Steven Rocha, had his fingertip bitten off during the fight. Coyotes CEO Xavier Gutierrez confirmed the news, per Sportsnet’s Eric Engel.

That had to be a fun question for the CEO to answer, right?

Per Arizona State University police, Nashaknik Allen Shontz was charged on suspicion of aggravated assaulted for biting off Rocha’s fingers. Five other fans involved were cited for disorderly conduct and were later released.

The police report also indicates that two other fans suffered injuries as a result of the scuffle. None of those injuries were considered life-threatening.

Coyotes Playing Games at ASU’s Mullett Arena

The Arizona Coyotes have been playing their games at Arizona State’s Mullett Arena this season, a multi-purpose venue on campus. The 5,000-seat stadium is small in size and the organization hopes it’s just a temporary setting.

The Coyotes previously played games at Gila River Arena in Glendale. However, the franchise owed the city $1.3 million in state in local taxes, per USA TODAY. The Coyotes did pay but it severed the relationship between the two sides.

So, now, Arizona’s NHL franchise is stuck playing its home games on a college campus in a small venue. The organization has also set aside 200-400 tickets for ASU students — which might add to the rowdiness of some games.

The Coyotes hope that this isn’t a long-term solution, but the organization doesn’t have a lot of options at the moment.

Outsider.com