LOOK: Outrageous Cost for a Family of Four to Attend an MLB Game Revealed

by Bryan Fyalkowski
outrageous-cost-family-four-attend-mlb-game-revealed

A graphic is circulating around social media showing how much it costs for a family of four to attend an MLB game. Safe to say, it is not cheap.

According to @TheHustle, the average cost to go to a game at the 30 MLB parks is $204.76. That includes four tickets, one parking space, two beers, two sodas and four hot dogs.

The most expensive family outing is to the Boston Red Sox’s Fenway Park – a $324.37 trip for four. The cheapest would be to the Arizona Diamondbacks’ Chase Field – a $126.34 evening for the family.

At the median mark are the Atlanta Braves’ Truist Park and Kansas City Royals’ Kaufmann Stadium. Those stadiums cost around $193.79 for an average family to visit.

Some people on social media have poked some holes in this chart, however. For instance: Can you really find a beer for $3 at the Colorado Rockies’ Coors Field? Or a soda for $2.50 at the Baltimore Orioles’ Camden Yards? Does a hot dog actually cost $3 at the Miami Marlins’ loanDepot Park? And you can find parking near the Houston Astros’ Minute Maid Park for less than $10?

That chart graphic might even be selling the total cost of attending an MLB game short. Which is even more ridiculous to think about.

It Costs Too Much to Attend MLB Game, Fans Are Flocking to NFL

A recent Yahoo! Sports article mentioned that attendance is down for 21 of MLB’s 30 teams. In all, ticket sales are down 6% from the last non-COVID-19-affected season of 2019.

“If MLB as a whole is down about 6% in tickets sold, that equates to roughly eight million fewer people going to games,” Lou DePaoli of General Sports Worldwide said. “That is concerning.”

The Score’s Travis Sawchik mentions that league-wide attendance is down 13.6% since Rob Manfred took over for Bud Selig as commissioner in 2015.

On the flip side, the NFL set an all-time attendance mark in 2021. The Rams and Chargers moving into Los Angeles’ new SoFi Stadium helped that, as did the Raiders moving to Las Vegas. Still, it is hard to not realize how much the NFL is taking laps around MLB at this point.

Outsider.com