WWE’s Ronda Rousey Fined, Suspended Following Wild Attack on Referee

by Patrick Norton
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As the WWE continues its fight against controversy on other fronts, a new battle opens regarding Ronda Rousey. However, whether the fine and suspension are part of the show remains unknown. After losing to Liv Morgan during SummerSlam’s Women’s Title Match, Rousey turned her anger toward the official.

The former UFC champion attacked the referee, pinning him to the ground after complaining that the official did not hear a pivotal call in the prior match. Objecting that Morgan tapped out, Rousey took a significant portion of her anger out on the unsuspecting official, Dan Engler. Fortunately, early indications point toward no injuries stemming from the event.

The suspension also comes with a significant, yet undisclosed fine. According to a statement released by WWE, the banishment is indefinite. However, a look ahead at future pay-per-view cards tells us Rousey’s suspension won’t last more than a month. Dave Meltzer of Wrestling Observer Radio suggests Ronda Rousey should still appear in next month’s Clash at the Castle show.

But regardless of the severity and reality of the suspension, prepare for the looming absence of Rousey in upcoming events. WWE’s statement says, “Due to her suspension, Rousey will not appear on this week’s Friday Night SmackDown.”

Ronda Rousey’s Least of WWE’s Worries

Attacking the referee – whether it’s serious or entertainment – isn’t a good look for Rousey. However, the story should fade into the news cycle over time as other WWE matters take precedence. The abrupt retirement of CEO Vince McMahon hangs over the head of the company currently. McMahon’s resignation stems from the uncovering of discrete payments to women covering up sexual misconduct allegations.

McMahon misappropriated more than $13 million of the company’s money for the payments. In addition to stepping away to a permanent end, McMahon must pay the money back to the company he ran for nearly half of a century.

Outsider.com